After graduating with a Bachelors of Fine Arts and a Bachelor of Science I was not clear on how to make a living from my art. So, I went into the business world full time and created my art part time.

While attracted to various expressions of my love for art, over the years the medium choice may have been made because of space or time limitations.

An early retirement from the corporate world and a move to a larger home gave me the opportunity to explore Raku Sculptural Ceramics. I fell in love with the balance of technique and serendipity. I loved pushing the limits of the clay and the Raku process. It is a passionate technique!

As life happens, I became a caregiver for my Mother. Pretty much all artist endeavors came to a halt. After she passed, and my sweet dog died I was full of sadness. I remembered what my Mother used to ask me if I was feeling down, “Are you doing any art?” I wasn’t.

A nephew sent me a link for a video demonstration of Fluid art. I was hooked. I watched hours of YouTube videos to learn the steps. The most common technique shown was a “Dirty Pour”. Adding oil and water to acrylic paints, mixing them just right, a happy magic came about.

I enjoyed it, taught it to family and friends but wanted to find a way to translate the technique to a larger scale. Even though I loved the smaller work, I was not happy with my large-scale results.

Using online research, I found award winning abstract artist Bette Ridgeway. I bought her video on the color blocking technique she calls “Layers of Light” Finally a large-scale technique that could take me to the next level. I wanted to learn more. Bette’s mentor was the Artist Paul Jenkins. I started researching him and the color blocking technique. There was not a lot of information out there to learn from.

The manipulation of the unstretched canvas made some remarkable results but I didn’t know how to do it. So I emailed Bette and ask her if she teaches any workshops. The answer was no.

She requested to see some of my current work and my Raku work so she could judge my level of ability. Once a year she will choose a student to teach the layering technique at her studio in Santa Fe. I was it for 2018!

She is an amazing artist, teacher and person. I came home and went to work. It is not an easy process so I have my share of “never to be seen” canvases but I also have some that have made me very happy to share. Some of these are in my portfolio.

I call my version of this technique, “Fluid Dimensions” .

Please enjoy.

Sections

Artist Statement

After graduating with a Bachelors of Fine Arts and a Bachelor of Science I was not clear on how to make a living from my art. So, I went into the business world full time and created my art part time.

While attracted to various expressions of my love for art, over the years the medium choice may have been made because of space or time limitations.

An early retirement from the corporate world and a move to a larger home gave me the opportunity to explore Raku Sculptural Ceramics. I fell in love with the balance of technique and serendipity. I loved pushing the limits of the clay and the Raku process. It is a passionate technique!

As life happens, I became a caregiver for my Mother. Pretty much all artist endeavors came to a halt. After she passed, and my sweet dog died I was full of sadness. I remembered what my Mother used to ask me if I was feeling down, “Are you doing any art?” I wasn’t.

A nephew sent me a link for a video demonstration of Fluid art. I was hooked. I watched hours of YouTube videos to learn the steps. The most common technique shown was a “Dirty Pour”. Adding oil and water to acrylic paints, mixing them just right, a happy magic came about.

I enjoyed it, taught it to family and friends but wanted to find a way to translate the technique to a larger scale. Even though I loved the smaller work, I was not happy with my large-scale results.

Using online research, I found award winning abstract artist Bette Ridgeway. I bought her video on the color blocking technique she calls “Layers of Light” Finally a large-scale technique that could take me to the next level. I wanted to learn more. Bette’s mentor was the Artist Paul Jenkins. I started researching him and the color blocking technique. There was not a lot of information out there to learn from.

The manipulation of the unstretched canvas made some remarkable results but I didn’t know how to do it. So I emailed Bette and ask her if she teaches any workshops. The answer was no.

She requested to see some of my current work and my Raku work so she could judge my level of ability. Once a year she will choose a student to teach the layering technique at her studio in Santa Fe. I was it for 2018!

She is an amazing artist, teacher and person. I came home and went to work. It is not an easy process so I have my share of “never to be seen” canvases but I also have some that have made me very happy to share. Some of these are in my portfolio.

I call my version of this technique, “Fluid Dimensions” .

Please enjoy.

Sections